Schrödinger’s cat

November 8, 2011

I usually read novels in bed, as my brain tends to be too tired to take in any more information for the day.  So the fact that this is the third post I am starting with a reference to a popular science book makes me think that perhaps I have not been working hard enough…

The book in question is The Emperor’s New Mind, by Roger Penrose.  The main thesis of this wonderful book is, apparently (and in a very small nutshell), that the mind does not work like a computer*.  However, I am currently about 3/4 of the way through it, and this has not yet been touched upon!  Rather, over 400 pages or so, Penrose has valiantly attempted to explain Turing machines, classical mechanics, relativity, quantum theory and cosmology to the interested (and, one must assume, quite dedicated) layperson.  I can only assume that all this is going to coalesce into a grand theory of Mind, but it does so far seem like quite an ambitious project.  Having tried to achieve this kind of comprehensive introduction to even the smallest of mathematical subjects myself in previous posts (you might have noticed that I have long since given up trying to do this), I have great respect for Penrose’s tenacity.  I find that the problem with this type of enterprise lies in trying to tread the line between being impenetrable to non-mathematicians, and boring for mathematicians.   While The Emperor’s New Mind is a great book, I think it is safe to say that it probably falls on the former side of this line; it is perhaps not entirely suitable for bedtime reading.

Anyway, I have just been reading Penrose’s take on the maltreated feline of this post’s title, and it got me thinking, so I thought I would discuss it.  The cat in question is a paradox which Erwin Schrödinger came up with in order to show the absurdity of trying to apply quantum theory at the classical physical level (that is, the everyday world with which we interact, as opposed to the exceedingly odd quantum level of subatomic particles).   This is, of course, a massive and complex subject, and I will only provide the merest of scrapes of its surface!  If you happen to be a pedantic physicist, then please do comment on any inaccuracies in what follows.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements